Plaster of Paris – in Dublin

Cross of the Scriptures & the South Cross, Clonmacnoise, Co. Offaly

The high cross is an early medieval form of Christian sculpture, unique to the British Isles. From around the 6th century onwards, monastic settlements developed all around Ireland. It is thought that high crosses were a way of marking out the sacred areas in the larger monasteries. The first high crosses are believed to have been made from wood and metal. Of course, none of these have survived to the present day. From around the 9th century onwards, the crosses began to be carved from stone. Interestingly, the earliest crosses appear to be replicas of the original wood and metal crosses, though in time their style evolved. There are almost 300 high crosses in Ireland, in various states of repair.

Let’s get plastered

Two crosses from Monasterboice, Co. Louth – Tall Cross & Muireadach’s Cross. On the right is the high cross from Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo.

In the late 19th century/early 20th century, a greater interest and awareness of national identity and archaeology took hold around Europe. Seeing as trying to transport rather ancient, rather heavy stone crosses around was out of the question, they went for the next best option. Faithful copies. At what turned out to be prohibitively expensive, plaster casts of some of the better known high crosses were painstakingly made. From 1898 to 1910, casts were made of some high crosses and these were shipped abroad to the UK, the USA and Australia. Interestingly, in 2005 the replicas were exhibited in Aichi, Japan where they were seen by over 2 million people.

L-R South Cross, Ahenny, Tall Cross, Monasterboice and Drumcliffe

Completely by accident, in May 2011 I came across an exhibition of these replicas in the Museum of Decorative Arts & History in Dublin. And so, all I have to show for my visit are a couple of pre-smartphone mobile phone snaps and a nice booklet šŸ™‚ It turned out to be a surprisingly compelling exhibition. I’ve seen loads of these high crosses over the years – it’s hard not to – but I had never realised how tall and imposing they were. In their normal setting, they’re out in the open air and somehow seem smaller. There’s nothing like standing in a darkened room with these crosses looming over you to concentrate the mind. It was also a unique opportunity to see how these crosses had evolved over time. The South Cross from Ahenny is a very basic cross which replicates its original wood and metal ancestors, while the later Muireadach’s Cross is awash with scenes from scripture. Interestingly, the Office of Public Works has gradually been making high quality replicas of the better known high crosses around Ireland and moving the originals indoors. Following on, after a fashion, in the footsteps of the original plaster casters.

The crosses exhibited in this exhibition were:

The North & South Crosses, Ahenny, Co. Tipperary

North Cross, Ahenny

These two 9th century crosses I’ve seen “in the wild”. Sorry they look a bit underwhelming but that’s the Irish weather in March for you! These days, Ahenny is off the beaten track and I had to drive along some alarmingly narrow and twisty country roads to get to it. The two crosses are situated in a quiet cemetery that’s situated in a fieldĀ  close to the village of Ahenny. They’re all that remains of the monastery at Kilclispeen. The interesting thing about these two high crosses is that they appear to replicate the earlier wood/metal crosses and mostly have abstract art on them. There are some figures from scripture on the base of the North cross but they’re not so obvious on my photo. Both crosses are considered to be very fine examples of Hiberno-Saxon art and are just two of a number of high crosses in this style in the area.

Their plaster casts were made in 1906 by an Italian modeller named Sig. Orlandi. According to the booklet I bought when looking at the exhibition, the cost of making the moulds for these two crosses was Ā£151. The two casts were producedĀ  at a cost of Ā£35.

 

 

 

Tall Cross & Muireadach’s Cross, Monasterboice, Co. Louth.

Muireadoch’s Cross & Tall Cross

These two crosses I saw on a geography field trip when I was an undergraduate. So not only do I not have photos of them (I am rather ancient, after all) but I barely remember them. I mostly remember my geography lecturer helpfully pointing out how the ground level in the cemetery was rising because of all the dead people buried there and that even when we died, we’d still have a contribution to make. Anyway, enough of that. What about the crosses?

Muireadach’s Cross is considered to be the finest of the high crosses in Ireland. Perhaps it’s unsurprising that it was the first cross to be moulded, back in 1896. It dates to the 9th century and depicts many scenes from scripture. In recent years, concern has been expressed over the damage the weather is doing to the cross. The Tall Cross lives up to its name, being almost 7 metres in height. The process of making moulds of this cross proved to be tricky because of the condition of the base.

Drumcliffe High Cross, Drumcliffe, Co. Sligo

Drumcliff High Cross.

Now this cross, I have no idea if I’ve ever seen. When I was 14 my family took a holiday in the north-west of Ireland and we visited Drumcliffe. These days it’s mostly known for being the alleged final resting place of W.B. Yeats. In olden times, it was a monastery and there is still a partial round tower remaining. There’s also this cross which I may have seen but not taken any particular notice of. It was cast in 1907 and is from the 11th or 12th century. Along with biblical scenes, it also has animals which is unusual.

St Tola’s Cross, Dysert O’Dea, Co. Clare

This cross is unusual in that it has no ring. It is from the later Romanesque series of crosses and instead of having biblical scenes, has a bishop on the shaft. It was one of the last crosses to be copied, work taking place in 1908. It is thought that this cross may have had wooden additions but of course these did not survive.

 

Author: Brenda

Chronology of a humdrum life